Connectivity

We all benefit when we make our world larger.

DMLA 21st Annual Conference

Jersey City, Oct. 27-29

Summary

Our 21st Annual Conference was held in Jersey City in October 2016 was an outstanding event. The sessions were reviewed by the attendees as some of the best ever covering subjects from Doing Business in China to Advances in Visual Recognition. In the Post Conference Survey we received Very Good or Excellent marks from over 83% of our attendees.

Great conferences like this don't happen without a lot of hard work from a lot of people.

Thanks so much to all our speakers, moderators and panelists whose contributions made our sessions so informative and interesting. We couldn’t have done it without you!

Big thanks to Ellen Boughn (Expert Witness Services) and her Program Committee: Doug Dawirs (DMLA), Ophelia Chong (Stock Pot Images), Paul Melcher (Melcher System), James Oh (Adobe) and Sonia Wasco (Grant Heilman Photography) for an amazing conference from start to finish.

These conferences have gotten more and more expensive to produce, especially in the NYC area, and our sponsors help to keep the costs in check and keep the attendee fees affordable. Special thanks to this year’s Platinum Sponsor Adobe who stepped up in a big way this year. And to Agency Access, our Gold Sponsor, who again provided the design work for the conference. To the rest of our sponsors: Capture, Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard LLP, Gaopin Images, Grant Heilman Photography, ImageProtect, Pickit, Pond5, and Visual Connections our deep appreciation.

A special thanks to Andrea Stern and Mary Egan of MOCA who not only secured the sponsors for this year but wrote the session summaries below.

  • Read more…Opening Keynote Address – View of the Industry & Business in China
  • Chai Jijun, Co-Founder and EVP of Visual China Group (VCG) gave an excellent opening address to the delegates attending the DMLA Conference. Chai Jijun started by contextualizing the history of Xinhua News Agency founded in the 1950s through to the established and growth of the VCG working with various international partners around the world such as Getty and acquiring agencies such as Tungstar in 2010 and the recent purchase of Corbis Images in 2016. The Chinese Market has seen a major change in the last 6 years where image sales, traditionally sold to the editorial print market, is moving towards New Media which accounts for 70% of VCG’s expected 2016 income. This shift is primarily due to the rapid expansion of the mobile internet market where 90% of users (circa 700m) are using this platform daily. Chai Jijun explained China is a good opportunity for foreign content as local material tends to be of a lower quality and there is a need for more global imagery.

  • Read more…Images are Weapons of Change
  • Karen Beard moderator of the session noted that each day 1.8b images loaded to social media. The panelists see this as an opportunity with Sheri R. Rosenberg commenting that visuals are taking messaging to a new level and enabling brands to mobilize their company. Adam Levine stated the attention span of humans is 8 seconds, less than that of a goldfish – 9 secs. In response to the question ‘does the market need to react to social change? and is it brand driven or brand response?’, the panel mentioned several companies who are now engaging more and doing things to reflect what their brand represents – e.g. healthier life style, so ceased advertising cigarettes. We were reminded that “most images are created by Anglos which is reflected in the images created”, i.e. the people and cultures represented. However there is now a strong demand for images that people at a local level can identify and engage with. Each of the panelists presented a project that had particular meaning and impact for them, all of which showed new ways of reaching people, telling a story and touching viewers.

  • Read more…Advances in Visual Recognition
  • Each of the panelists gave an overview of their company technology and presented instances of where the use of computers to replace humans in certain tasks can be beneficial, and highlighted some of the limitations. For Imagga the main aim is to make images recognizable. Their technology is used to add tags to speed up the process of delivery of content from production to distribution on the internet. EyeEm offers a free photo and editing app. Curation is based on image quality and aesthetics, and can also be adapted to brand identity. EyeEm train the computers to recognize quality and what is commercial making the process as automated as possible. They tag the images with a specially controlled vocabulary and harness their knowledge to filter a vast quantity of content at speed. On average it takes 80mili-seconds per photo to sort and tag an image! Andreas Veit voiced the research perspective, and he believes computers can now surpass human performance in certain areas, but can’t get into the creative space well, being unable to ‘reason’. All agreed that computers are better at speed and consistencies, but for now they are useful tools, but have no instincts.

  • Read more…Young Guns
  • With charm and enthusiasm moderator Ophelia Chong of Stockpot Images fired a series of questions at group of six ‘Young Guns’ whose average age is 26: When did you first own a mobile? Average age 11-12. When did you first own a computer? Surprisingly most were in mid-teens. When did you first go on social network and which one? Between 15-17, Instagram / Facebook. What’s your attention span – how long do you look at an image on Instagram? 5 seconds! (Less than a goldfish…!) This generation uses stock as a way of selling clients into an idea. Then they create their own imagery. “A lot of stock isn’t real enough for what we want to portray” and they will shoot something rather than use stock, and the stock they use will generally be crowdsourced. Instagram appears to be a source of choice for inspiration, providing ‘real’ imagery. Ophelia’s final questions: The next trend = over-saturation; the next color = pink, concluded with: Next act to die? = Facebook (!) You heard it first at DMLA.

  • Read more…How some agencies are bucking the trend and growing their traditional licensing businesses
  • Each of the three companies on the panel is a hi-end imagery producer. For each of them nurturing their relationship with their photographers is central to the way they grow their business. They have many new applications to join the agency but want to keep quality and curation high. Caven’s Peter Hannert would like to see the number of images in a collection capped and that each image should earn its place. “Don’t make collections bigger, make them better.” ‘Curation’ is the term most used by all three companies. Westend61 photographers are each allocated an art director. Distribution is something that Westend61 and Caven give a lot of thought to – “you spend a lot of time protecting the relationship of your contributors so choose your distributor carefully” says Hannert. Dissolve is sole distributor of its stock and creates its own brand promotional campaigns using stock film clips, successfully resulting in business from other brands. But Aaron Booth says getting customers to look at your images is tough. What stories are you telling around content to invite clients to look at it? “All the work around the content needs to convey a message to make the customer care.

  • Read more…A 360° View on Immersive Content
  • The focus of this panel was to address the VR market and where it is believed we will see a major growth over the next four years; it is estimated the VR hardware and content could soon reach over $20million and by 2025 potentially a $80million business. Are we ready for this explosion? Michael Villasenor, New York Times, explained how the company has changed it culture from hard edge news reporting to a leader in storytelling. They are now producing more content including VR material and will see this grow over the next 6-12 months. 360cities a specialist agency from Prague which has grown it’s contributors from 10 based in Europe to over 11,000+ around the world, producing spherical panoramic imagery used across multiple platforms. They see their next phase of VR to be in the gaming industry. All the panelist agreed, including VideoBlocks, that this is an exciting time and there is a need to be involved in long term projects not only for the mobile and gaming industry but this technically is ideal for the education and medical markets. It is good to know they are working in an area where larger players are making their mark such as Getty.

  • Read more…Tips, Traps, and Recent Legal Developments Affecting Your Stock Content
  • A panel of legal experts gave an overview on the current legal development in North America speaking on subjects such as ‘Fair Use and Fair Dealing’, ‘Handling Form Agreements’, ‘Copyright Small Claims Court’ with in depth explanation of editorial vs commercial use giving examples of recent cases and the Court decisions. The Moderator, James Oh from Adobe, presented various images of graffiti and street art and asked each of the panelists to give their expert opinion of whether the use of these images or part of the image would cause problems. After a lively debate, it was agreed each image and usage would need to be assessed individually to ascertain whether it is a ‘work of original art and fixed’. Within the US and Canada there are no copyright acts which protect graffiti works, even if the artwork was classified as legal rather than illegal. Any copyright claims would have to be brought in the formal artist’s name, however as most street artists are unknown the infringement cannot be taken to court. To date no court cases have been brought therefore there’s no set precedence to refer to.

  • Read more…Catch Me If You Can
  • Doug Dawirs from DMLA introduced three different companies where each gave an overview on their technology which either protects copyright imagery on the internet or finds unauthorized uses and infringements. Digimarc works with Photoshop where the copyright holder of an image can embed invisible barcodes within the metadata which are unable to be removed even if the image is cropped or edited. Pixelrights has just launched a new service ‘SmartFrame’ which helps the copyright holder of the image to engage with the audience indexed by Google and features a built-in sharing option with Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. SmartFrame also allows for the addition of attribution and caption, dynamic watermarking, protection and deterrent against drag and drop usage and provides copyright protection. ImageProtect offer website auditing, where they can crawl the net daily, weekly or monthly producing reports on infringed images allowing the rights holder to either seek a license or take further action with the end users. All panelists agreed that the best way to protect your imagery online is to use a combination of their services: Digimarc and SmartFrame for future content and ImageProtect for material already distributed.

Download Program PDF

Program

Thursday, October 27 — Metropolitan Pavilion, 123 West 18th Street, New York, NY 10011
Time Title Description Track & Room
10:00 AM Visual Connections Expo

http://www.visualconnections.com/newyork

For Visual Connections exhibitors only

 
  7:30 PM DMLA Opening Reception

(Immediately following Visual Connections)


Sponsored by…

Agency Access

Visual Connections


Drinks sponsored by…

Adobe

Metropolitan Pavilion

Fourth Floor

123 West 18th Street, New York, NY 10011

(Between 6th & 7th Avenues)

 
Friday, October 28 — The Hyatt Regency Jersey City on the Hudson, 2 Exchange Place, Jersey City, NJ 07302
Time Title Description Track & Room
  8:00 AM Breakfast and Registration   Hudson Room
  8:30 AM to
  5:30 PM
Meeting Area Looking for a place to network and demo during the DMLA 2016 Conference? Want a place to call your own? We’re offering a limited number of meeting tables so that you don’t have to look for a place to meet with colleagues, business partners and customers. These tables will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis and will include power and wifi access. The cost is a “steal" at $295 for DMLA members for the two days, and $395 for non-members. Don’t wait! We have a limited number and they are certain to go quickly!! Go here to sign up for a table and/or to register for the conference. You must be registered for the Conference to reserve a table. Tables will be in a room directly across from sessions. Holland Room
  9:00 AM

Welcoming Message

Hudson Room
  9:30 AM

Chai Jijun, VCGChai Jijun
Co-Founder/EVP
Visual China Group

View of the Industry and Doing Business in China

Keynote
Hudson Room
10:45 AM

Moderator: Karen Beard, Shestock

Panelists:
Adam Levine, Branding + Marketing Consultant
Sheri Radel Rosenberg, Maven
Witold Riedel, Tea & Water Ltd


Sponsored by…

Pickit

Images are Weapons of Change

Images are weapons of change, as the saying goes an image speaks a thousand words. Public opinion has been swayed by the photographs from the war front, images of love and acceptance and of events that change how we interact with each other and the world. As we come up to the election this November, it is even more crucial that as image-makers and curators we are aware of how powerful our choices are. Join us and hear how art buyers and editors are choosing images to present their clients’ message to this world that changes with each post, click and comment.

Trends
Hudson Room
12:00 PM

Ophelia Chong, Stock Pot Images

DMLA Talk: Love + Fear

Stock agencies are experts at putting the right image into the right box, we are able to glean from the public mindset keywords that will bring up the “right” images. But are we also the perpetrators of stereotypes? I founded Stock Pot Images to take the fear of the “stoner” out of the ghetto that minority and LGBT groups were relegated out of fear of the “unknown” and love is what drove me to change the public’s view, to legalize and to present the true faces and communities of cannabis.

Trends
Hudson Room
12:30 PM Lunch   Hudson Room
  2:00 PM

Moderator: Paul Melcher, Melcher System

Panelists:
Steve Hercher, 360cities
Michael Villaseñor, New York Times
• Greta Pittard, VideoBlocks

A 360° View On Immersive Content

Is immersive (360 and VR photos/videos) about to revolutionize the stock photo market? We will explore the technology and its opportunities with expert from all sides: creation, licensing and publishing.

Technology
Hudson Room
  3:45 PM

Analisa Goodin, Catch&Release

DMLA Talk: Taming the Fire Hose of Internet Content: Curation, Licensing, and the Future of Production

With the rise of consumer imagery flooding the internet, and camera equipment getting better, smaller, and more affordable, the content of the Internet is an ever-ripe source for agencies and brands looking to make more engaging ads with less time and budget. Analisa Goodin, CEO of Catch&Release, Inc will discuss how certain business models can consume or be consumed by the opportunity of this content, and what the future of ad production looks like when it leverages the power of existing media.

Trends
Hudson Room
  4:15 PM

Moderator: James Oh, Adobe

• Dan Pollack, Dan Pollack Law
Heidi Garfield, Shutterstock
Margaret Vincent, Stocksy United
Nancy Wolff, Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard & Legal Counsel to DMLA

Free Legal Advice: Tips, Traps, and Recent Legal Developments Affecting Your Stock Content

A panel of legal experts will speak about current legal developments and how they affect you and the stock content ecosystem, including discussions on alternative art forms like graffiti and street art; what constitutes ‘editorial’ use and when it can be problematic; how to handle form agreements that may not fit your specific licensing situations; the current landscape on fair use (or fair dealing) rules; and learn about why you should care about the proposed Copyright Small Claims Court Bill.

Legal
Hudson Room
  5:30 PM

Moderator: Karen D'Silva

Maria Dias, Getty Marketing
Keren Sachs, Shutterstock
Brianna Wettlaufer, Stocksy United
Irelyn Akers, Brandwatch


Sponsored by…

Agency Access

Fireside Chat: Will You Be A Part Of The Post-Digital Era?

Ray Kurzwell from Goggle describes today's marketplace as the age of acceleration. we are experiencing an explosive power of exponential growth. The 21st century will be equivalent to 20,000 years of progress. with this progress, we are now faced with multiple forms of electronic media, and if used correctly, we have an opportunity to create a customer experience that will move them along in the buying cycle.

Digital marketing is the promotion of products or brands via web, social media, mobile, direct mail, point of sale, etc. Connecting with clients through digital marketing gives you a deeper insight into your customer's behavior and their preferences, and in turn a better chance of you engaging them in lucrative interactions.

After a day of presentations and panels, join us as this marketing conversation moves from the stage into the audience. Our key marketers will be sitting side by side with us as they discuss the marketing they feel has been effective. Hear how our industry is automating their marketing, building content marketing, using big data, experimenting in mobile marketing, communicating through the current social media platforms, and optimizing search engine advertising.

If you are feeling a little overwhelmed about how to best market your company, you're not alone. This lively discussion promises to bring you up to speed and send your head into a spin of innovative ideas.

Complimentary beer and wine will be served.

Marketing
Hudson Room
  7:00 PM DMLA Attendee Reception   Manhattan Room
Saturday, October 29 — The Hyatt Regency Jersey City on the Hudson, 2 Exchange Place, Jersey City, NJ 07302
Time Title Description Track & Room
  8:00 AM Breakfast and Registration   Hudson Room
  8:30 AM to
  5:30 PM
Meeting Area Looking for a place to network and demo during the DMLA 2016 Conference? Want a place to call your own? We’re offering a limited number of meeting tables so that you don’t have to look for a place to meet with colleagues, business partners and customers. These tables will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis and will include power and wifi access. The cost is a “steal" at $295 for DMLA members for the two days, and $395 for non-members. Don’t wait! We have a limited number and they are certain to go quickly!! Go here to sign up for a table and/or to register for the conference. You must be registered for the Conference to reserve a table. Tables will be in a room directly across from sessions.  
  9:00 AM

Brianna Wettlaufer, Stocksy United

DMLA Talk: Power and Ethics in Online Communities

As member-driven products and services continue to propel companies like Uber and Airbnb, what role do online communities play in the success of a product? Brianna Wettlaufer,the CEO and co-founder of the stock-photo platform Stocksy United, will speak through the story of Stocksy's pivot from crowd-sourcing to shared ownership and collaboration, sharing the building blocks of an ethics-based business and how they relate to fostering trust and loyalty.

Trends
Hudson Room
  9:20 AM

Moderator: Doug Dawirs, DMLA

Panelists:
Rob Sewell, Pixelrights
Chris Shepard, Digimarc
Jonathan Thomas, ImageProtect

Catch Me If You Can

We are at a turning point for how copywritten imagery is published on the Web. Come see how to deter, detect and monitize unauthorized use of your pictures through technology.

Technology
Hudson Room

10:45 AM

Moderator: Taylor Davidson

Panelists:
Ramzi Rizk, EyeEm
Georgi Kadrev, Imagga
Andreas Veit, Cornell Tech

Advances In Visual Recognition

Can computers do a better job at keywording and editing than humans? We will explore the latest advancements of visual recognition with those who create them.

Technology
Hudson Room
12:15 PM

Christina Hawatmeh, Scopio

DMLA Talk: Searching and Using Images from Social Media

"Scope It Out" A real time image search and licensing platform, that offers a way to build libraries for publishing. I will discuss the messiness of Social Search and Indexing. I'd like to discuss the benefits of using generated content, why humans are drawn to it, its timeliness and innocence, but the difficulties in searching and organizing this content on -demand, with a culture that is constantly changing online.

Trends
Hudson Room
12:30 PM Lunch   Hudson Room
  2:00 PM

Moderator: Ophelia Chong, Stock Pot Images

Panelists:
Kendall Henderson, DKNY
• Taylor Simpson, Red Antler
• Matthew King, Matt King Design
• Mary Galloway, Freelance Designer
• Alena Jaffe, Red Antler
Pei Liew, Google Creative Lab


Sponsored by…

Pond5

Young Guns

What are they up to? NYC based designers, all under 30. What inspires them? Where are they sourcing images? Where do they think stock is heading? How do they use social media for their clients? What are their thoughts on print vs web?

Sales
Hudson Room
  3:15 PM

Navid Safabakhsh, Placeit.net

DMLA Talk: What Happens To A Photo After It's Purchased?

What kind of transformations does it go under? How can we become more useful to our customers by creating something closer to that end product?

 

Hudson Room
  3:45 PM

Moderator: Lee Torrens, Canva

Panelists:
• Stephan Bock, Westend61
• Peter Hannert, Cavan Images
• Aaron Booth, Dissolve


Sponsored by…

Adobe

How some agencies are bucking the trend and growing their traditional licensing businesses

Without inventing a new technology, or new business model or cutting prices to nothing, how can a traditional stock photo licensing business succeed and grow in the current market.

Sales

Session Notes

Opening Keynote Address - View of the Industry & Business in China
Presenter: Chai Jijun, Co-Founder/EVP, VCG (Visual China Group)

Overview

View of the Industry and Doing Business in China.

Notes

Short History of China Photo Industry:

Xinhua News Agency has been around since the 1950s starting with editorial images and soon became an established news agency. In 1980 their news service was extended working in partnership with AP followed by Reuters.

During the 1990s, two Chinese commercial agencies were launched, Panorama and Champion Images, selling to design companies and publishers. Together with Xinhua these agencies were the only pictures agencies in China until May 2005 when Xinhua established PhotoCom (VCG) – which was the first internet based library, a year later Image China was founded.

Besides AP and Reuters, VCG started partnering with other picture agencies such as Getty and Sepia primarily to sell images into the Chinese market. In 2005 VCG and Getty established Getty Images China opening local offices where business grew very fast; 2 years later Corbis opened with own local Chinese office which proved successful for a short time but finally decided to close their office and return their business to direct selling from the UK.

In 2010 VCG acquired Tungstar (the biggest entertainment agency in China similar to Splash News). 2014 saw VCG going public and the following year in 2015 VCG invested in 500px and Panorama went public in NEEQ. In January 2016 VCG expanded again acquiring Corbis Images.

China Market Overview:

Current total market is worth approx., $200M –VCG has the largest market share with 60 staff working across their offices.

This has seen a year on year growth; back in 2014 total income was $65m where $40m was attributed to licensing and related services. In 2015 income was $87m with $60m from licensing.

The Chinese market is very different from the global market where micro stock has just launched. However the user experience has not been good due to the internet connection in China.

The following is a comparison of how the market is changing.

Genre 2010 2016   Media Trends 2010 2016
Editorial Images 27% 45%   Newspapers 32% 10%
RM Creative 51% 20%   Magazines 28% 10%
RF Creative 22% 30%   New Media 30% 70%
Microstock 5%   Broadcasting/Publishing 10  

In the first quarter of 2016, the top 20 internet companies were 12 USA and 7 Chinese. In the next 3 years, the US and China will continue to dominate internet market, however for the first time this year the Chinese market surpassed the US with Apple sales of $1.7b.

Why is China’s internet industry developing rapidly?

1) US unable to compete with China closed market; Within the e-commerce market each have their own versions - US has Amazon where China has Alibaba; therefore, they are not seeing US companies coming into China.

2) Huge market and pop, total number of users 700m, of which 92.5% are mobile internet users.

3) Poor condition of China industry - long establish government/state owned media companies far outnumber commercial media companies, however this is changing. Mobile also keeps fast pace of development; in the first quarter, out of the top 12 mobile providers 8 are Chinese products; China is the largest market for Apple. Mobile manufactures are pricing their product at the mid-range market. As mobile device is becoming the major usage of communication and internet usage, this is a critical area of development, an opportunity and challenge especially in China.

Opportunities and Challenges in Chinese Market.

1) Internet Accelerates Content Consumption – especially use of imagery. WeChat integrates functions with social international and payment function – 700m users of which 90% use the internet on a daily basis and 50% spend more than one hour per day. 300m people receive news information from WeChat; 27% of content is sports related. 5% of these accounts pay for official use totalling $300 per year, however most are using unauthorised pictures which give VCG an opportunity to sell legitimate content.

2) Boundaries between Media and Commercial – companies can reach their audience without using traditional methods. For example, Powerbar is the largest e-commerce platform in China. Similarly, Emap – like Google Map – also provides news, traffic update/accidents – high quality travel news. New media forms bring in huge editorial content

3) Anti-Piracy and Technology – extremely serious challenge in China. Compensation for a single image could be $200 - $2,000. Using new technology to track infringement will help; VCG is the first company to digitally time stamp images to preserve copyright across 20,000 social media accounts, 100m pictures. They will continue to protect the industry and find infringements.

4) Local Content – lack of high quality images as Chinese photographers tend to concentrate on editorial content such as travel and landscapes – most of their high-quality images come from overseas especially Korea – this is a good opportunity for foreign content.

VCG’s future development Strategy:

• Focus on China market
• B2B to B2C
• Investment Strategy
• Diversified Development

Images are Weapons of Change
Moderator: Karen Beard, Shestock      Panelists: Adam Levine, Sheri Radel Rosenberg, Witold Riedel

Overview

Images are weapons of change, as the saying goes an image speaks a thousand words. Public opinion has been swayed by the photographs from the war front, images of love and acceptance and of events that change how we interact with each other and the world. As we come up to the election this November, it is even more crucial that as image-makers and curators we are aware of how powerful our choices are. Join us and hear how art buyers and editors are choosing images to present their clients’ message to this world that changes with each post, click and comment.

Notes

Karen Beard moderator of the session noted that each day 1.8b images loaded to social media. The panelists see this as an opportunity with Sheri R. Rosenberg commenting that visuals are taking messaging to a new level and enabling brands to mobilise their company. Adam Levine observed that the attention span of a goldfish is 9 seconds, however the average attention span of humans is 8 seconds!

Question: Does the market need to interact to social change?

Is it brand driven or brand response?

Gender fluidity reflected in the magazine showing the image of ‘Genzee’ on the cover. Brands are now engaging more and doing things to reflect what their brand is. E.g. giving staff a holiday on Black Friday, or CBS had taken on a brand mission about health and therefore ceased advertising cigarettes because they want to reflect healthy life style. These brand decisions need to be made at the company level if they are to be authentic, which is what is happening at Cover Girl/REI/CBS. Each one has the opportunity to shift the way things are going.

Stock images are mostly created by Anglos which is expressed in social and cultural imagery shown all over the world. (For example we heard from VCG that they struggle to find high quality images of China as Chinese photographers tend to concentrate on editorial content such as international travel and landscapes, and most of their high-quality images come from overseas especially Korea. There is a strong demand for images of the local community and culture.

Witold suggested that if we don’t just push our own vision of the world we might learn something! Sheri reminded us that symbols in different countries mean different things; in Japan you can’t show your tattoos, and that ‘localism’ is important – and asked “will there be a backlash in this global culture?” – if local needs are not reflected in the imagery created.

How do you balance the need to understand the local culture but to place it in context - that it is only part of what exists? Social media has the means to open awareness.

Social media offers multi voice media; it offers greater representation. More people feel represented; they have a platform – it is an empowered consumer tool.

Each of the panelists were asked to present a project that had particular meaning and impact for them:

Sheri R Rosenberg spoke about the “Truth” campaign bringing awareness of tobacco to the younger generation in early 2000s. The project began in Florida and then went national. The promotion shows 1200 bodybags! Such was the power of the imagery that it spoke to a generation, and it worked! The campaign talked about tobacco in a new way and really influenced people. It was ground breaking, and had an amazing response.

For Adam Levine it was the Project on Depression – Zoloft DTC advertisement, which was important to him. The campaign was showing that depression was a medical condition “it is not who I am.” He noted that the advertising around depression did not relate to him, and did not involve him (he was diagnosed with HIV and suffered from depression). Previous campaigns had presented the stereotype and people didn’t recognise themselves in it. This project really wanted people to identify and project themselves into the campaign.

Witold Riedel had worked on the “Real Beauty” Dove / Unilever Campaign, with photographer Rankin. Using people who are not stereotypical model-shaped, the campaign was showing that beauty doesn’t attach only to the perfect body.

Another project Witold related was the one for Seimens “Real -------“ campaign, 2009. For this they photographed real people – part of the workforce creating wind turbines.

They shot a series of images of the 50k Siemens workers in USA showing that jobs are created and who the people are that build our infrastructure. The images showed the world they work in and succeeded in creating something that doesn’t feel like advertising.

The project also brought the photographer closer to creative process. Improvisation, no preconceived image. Telling stories – putting faces to the stories – humanising the company.

The panel posed questions: Is there a backlash from social media! Are we looking for deeper connections? Who benefits from us on social media? The sole purpose of Facebook is to keep you on Facebook!!

How do we protect ourselves from algorithms? Facebook add content that they think we want to see…

Question: How can stock be used to create the story that you want to write?

Witold responded that there is a need to reflect the real world – only in Saudia Arabia are women not allowed to drive a man, yet his online search found only 2 images that show a woman driving a man. This doesn’t reflect the global experience.

Question: Is stock a means to drive social change or is social change part of your stock? Get people to provide the story then we will always stay relevant. You need to have the responsibility to drive change and work with the photographer to ensure their story is being told correctly. Important for agencies to drive social change but photographers should not try to get too far ahead of the curve, but rather find out what is in demand. You can no longer look ahead 5 and 10 years, everything is moving too quickly these days; imagery should reflect the times in which we live now, think of the patterns of social relevance.

A 360° View on Immersive Content
Moderator: Paul Melcher, Melcher Systems      panelists: Steve Hercher, Michael Villasenor, Greta Pittard

Overview

Is immersive (360 and VR photos/videos) about to revolutionize the stock photo market? We will explore the technology and its opportunities with expert from all sides: creation, licensing and publishing.

Notes

VR market will see a major growth over the next four years where it is estimated the VR hardware and content could reach over $20 million

MV – Explained that VR is a way of storytelling and giving advice, keeping readers in that world as well as understanding a journalist endeavours which is hard to describe in a written format. The New York Times, as a long-established news company, has changed its culture in the last 4-6 years to become a leader in storytelling; to start looking at the eco-system more broadly and express stories in different ways. Mobile is hitting a plateau primarily due to the limits of screen size and battery life. 70% of their audiences are mobile users where 1.3million subscribers in the US have a paper delivered to their front door. The NY Times recently partnered with Google to supply cardboard VR glasses to be included in their newspaper deliver to their customers. This was to showcase a story of displaced children; GE also partnered with NY Times to deliver the glasses (cost factor) and Mini-Cooper helped to promote the whole piece. What does it mean for the future? They will produce more content not only news pieces or music but fun piece. Currently they have 35 films with 10m views, 6 mins viewed on their platform. Market is going to grow within the next 6-12 months exploring the bigger ways outside the standard app, become an $80 million business by 2025.

SH – Specialist agency started in 2008 based in Prague, a content publishing platform, small group of contributors about 10 based in Europe and has grown 11,000+ contributors with 100s of customers. Spherical panoramic imagery, 360 x 180, equirectangular 2:1 ratio – viewed online on their browser. Focus on platform and to support community (keen amateur photographers), they concentrate on expert photographers, they prefer to deal with quality vs quantity. Board client base from WWF to MailPlus – across advertising, editorial, mobile & VR. Next phase of growth – gaming industry 30-40% on their enquires are coming from this part of the industry.

GP – The essential membership for the creative community. Subscription based licensing from $149 per year – unlimited downloads, worldwide unlimited usage. Graphicstock and Audioblocks two sister companies based on the same model. Access to market place – discounted clips directly from creators, 2.7m clips and growing from top stock content creators and brands such as Discovery Access, Wavebreak Media etc. Able to offer a low price as they control content and have agree pricing with their contributors who receive 100% royalties; Videoblocks achieves their revenue from the subscription fee. Over the last 18 months $3.5m has been paid in commissions and 2.5 m clips uploaded.

In April 2016, 360 VR was launched with a goal to provide creatives with the newest type of content to help encourage creators, media companies to experiment with this ever-growing industry. They launched with four US based companies (Overture, Offhollywood, SubVRsive, 360Labs), with DeepVR in South Africa and Atmosphaeres in Australia, with thousands of clips from diverse locations. Licensing terms are simple, with royalty free, all media, worldwide, in perpetuity rights. If their customer has subscribed to their service, the images within their Members Library is included in the membership fee. Within their Market place two fees are payable being $399 for monoscopic 360 VR and £499 stereoscopic.

Q: What type of gear is used to create the content? MV- A device that is more disposable where the technical quality is good and portable. SH – easy to use with too low res quality; what will be the factor for 360 video will be the price. GP – Nokia 360s devices with GoPro.

Q: Where do you see growth stock 360 VR / What is your thinking when you produce content? GP – a lot of external companies do a start to finish product, don’t need stock footage yet, however as things progress you will see an increase in this type of stock material. MV – browser based experience, get a sense of space this is an area where stock footage will see a growth. SH – most of the consumption of 360cities content is on mobile rather than desktop. More exciting projects; long term, outside gaming, will be in education/medical, there will be a need for this type of content. GP – 90% of VR downloads are from membership 10% from Marketplace, doesn’t have the same traction yet that the rest of the content, but is growing.

Q: What do you see as your main barriers for hardware and costs of producing content. MV – costs need to be taken in across the broad, from user where there may be a need to upgrade mobile devices to producing – in the past you had to stitch separately, now there are tech devices and software which stitches automatically.

Q: Getty VR – entry of larger players in the market, what are your thought? SH – has recently agreed a licence agreement with Getty, cannot discuss this yet. GP – it is great, we are all here to help the community – it all helps. MV – breath of relief knowing they have taken on a area of business that the larger players are involved in, they are now sitting amongst Getty and other content creators it empowers creators and it is good to know that they made the right decision.

Tips, Traps, and Recent Legal Developments Affecting Your Stock Content
Moderator: James Oh, Adobe      Panelists: Dan Pollack, Heidi Garfield, Margaret Vincent, Nancy Wolff

Overview

A panel of legal experts will speak about current legal developments and how they affect you and the stock content ecosystem, including discussions on alternative art forms like graffiti and street art; what constitutes ‘editorial’ use and when it can be problematic; how to handle form agreements that may not fit your specific licensing situations; the current landscape on fair use (or fair dealing) rules; and learn about why you should care about the proposed Copyright Small Claims Court Bill.

Notes

Showcased items of work giving example to question whether works are in copyright or not.

Graffiti and Street Art – is it protected? Within US and Canadian copyright acts there is no protection stated for graffiti – you would need to assess each work on an individual basis to ascertain whether it is a work of original art and fixed only then can it be classified as a ‘work of art’. Author has right to his or her particular work especially things like short terms and phrases – however fonts in not included under US copyright, it is the expression and not the way it is written.

Would copyright be applicable if graffiti or street art would be classified as a legal work rather than illegal? The panel agreed there is no difference between legal and illegal work or whether the artist create a criminal piece of work and/or is fined, it is classified as a work of art if deemed so? An original creation, fixed is a work of art. However, any copyright claim has to be brought in the (formal) name of the artists, most street artists are unknown, therefore the infringement cannot be taken to court – there has never been a Banksy claim, even though the artists is well known, this may be as Banksy wants his work to be shared.

Multiple Street Alley art shown if the picture is used in full it could be classified as editorial purposes depending on the usage. Commercial usage is a different case.

If there is a subject/model in front of the graffiti reducing the copyrightable pieces, therefore covering it up more, is the risk zero? No, but it will reduce the risk, however the artist may not want to be associated with end product – again this is a case by case scenario.

Most lawyers do not represent graffiti artists.

Example Case: Tierney v Moschino - mural painted 2012, the mural was used as a pattern on a dress worn to a Met Gala in 2015. It did not help that one publication stated it was on the worst dressed list. The artist sued stating they felt it damaged his reputation. Moschino settled out of court one day after the ruling stated the dress was illegal. To date no graffiti suit has made it to court, so there is no preceding case to set a precedent.

Editorial use: Definition from NW - editorial is classified as images that are used to illustrate, is newsworthy, in the public interest and truthful. There must be written content to contextualize the image and what it is illustrating.

Two examples of recent cases: Michael Jordan and Jump 23 Inc vs Dominick’s Finer Foods, LLC and Safeway Inc. A congratulations advert was created, however the courts ruled this was not editorial use but commercial and in fact an endorsement brand extension and awarded $8.9m dollars in compensation which was given to a charity.

Michael Jordan v Jewel Food Stores, Inc – similar congratulation ad – logo and slogan connected to Michael Jordan in general, brand had something to gain – High court moved in favour of Jordan, however it was settled after the above case was announced.

You need to ask, is the work using someone’s name to benefit your brand e.g. Katherine Heigl v Duane Reade Inc. Courts settled in favour of Heigl. The Instagram post showed Katherine leaving a Duane Reade with bags, it was felt her identity boosted the brand of the drug store, therefore was used out of context.

Handling Form Agreements – That May not fit your Situation: top six tips:

1) Propose using your standard agreement and explain why it is more appropriate

2) Be careful of ‘work for hire’ or other ownership transfer language

3) Watch for breadth of the warranties.

4) Indemnity and imitation of liability – Check for mutually and whether damage limits apply to indemnification.

5) Insurance – remove inapplicable requirements and adjust overly high coverage amounts.

6) Battle of the forms – may need language to allow for key licensing terms to be in the Invoice/IPO and make it clear that ownership rights are not transferred.

Fair Use and Fair Dealing

The Fair Use doctrine in the US and the Fair Dealing statues in Canada allow for limited copyright of copyright works without permission. Fair Dealing is more narrowly construed, with an exclusive list of contexts in which the use of a copyright work without permission is deemed not to be a copyright infringement. By contract, Fair Use provides a non-exclusive four-factor analysis for considering all types of unauthorised uses.

In Canada, it is not an act – Fair Dealing can be applied for the purposes of research, private study, education, parody or satire and does not infringe copyright. Fair Dealing for the purposes of criticism or review as well as news reporting does not infringe copyright if the following are mentioned (course, name of author/performer/maker/broadcaster).

All the above are guidelines and not rules – it’s a case by case decision, lots of judgement calls.

Copyright Small Claims Court:

After two years of study, in September 2013 the US Copyright Office published a report, which included recommendations about establishing a copyright small claims court. More information is available at: www.copyright.gov/docs/smallclaims/usco-smallclaims.

There is a New Library of Congress for the US libraries, at the moment, there is lots of tension between the role of the registered copyright office and library – stay tuned.

Catch Me If You Can
Presenters: Doug Dawirs, DMLA        Panelists: Rob Sewell, Chris Shepard, Jonathan Thomas

Overview

We are at a turning point for how copywritten imagery is published on the Web. Come see how to deter, detect and monitize unauthorized use of your pictures through technology.

Notes

CS – Digimarc works with Photoshop – embed barcodes to give it an ID that can be removed. Even when the images are cropped or edited the embedded ID remains when the image is out on the web. Therefore, it makes it easier for the copyright own to protect their images and find infringements.

RS – Pixelrights – new image technology called SmartFrame help engage with audience, marketing ops and protect images. 1992 was the very first image published on the World Wide Web. It is estimated 1.1 trillion images will be taken in 2016, digital cameras have dropped in sales due to mobile connections – 8 billion connections. 80% of all images will be taken on a mobile device in 2016. And it’s estimated that by 2025 75% of the millennium generation will be working in this way. SmartFrame - www.pixelrights.com/smartframe will make it difficult to steal images but easy to share. It will be safely indexed by Google, feature built-in sharing option for Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest et al. Embed anywhere live socials feed, tag people, places, dates and event. Tag and link elements within the image to shops and deep-zoom. Has a one click to buy and license image, and gives instant delivery with no loss of performance.

SmartFrame allows for the addition of attribution and caption, dynamic watermarking, protection and deterrent against drag and drop usage and provides copyright protection.

Pixelrights is also interested in how you can add revenue through tagging of brand

JT – ImageProtect – Build a community of visual artists and copyright experts for the protection and education of international copyright. 8 out of 10 images on commercial websites are sold, 15% of art buyers use Google as an image search tool. Copyright owners are being deprived of billions of dollars, no simple or cost effective end to end copyright compliance services and communities to effectively combat global theft. The possibility of infringement will only increase. Only 2% of all photographers register their copyright, and you cannot file a lawsuit in the US if you haven’t registered your images. 65% of all infringements occur within the US. Image Protect offer website auditing, can crawl the net daily, weekly or monthly, which is a great way to relicense your images. They are working to create a Copyright 101 Forum

DD – if you use the technology from different companies in combination, such as Digmarc and Pixelrights, you can work in synergy and have total protection on your content.

One of the positive elements of both SmartFrame and Digimarc is that you do not have to install a plugin, which makes it an easier solution for end users/

Question: You need to register your images to make a claim, how easy is registration? Image Protect has simplified the process of registration to make it easier to understand. They have created a template which pulls in all the standard data to make multiple registrations, and when images are uploaded it keeps and maintains the data which flows easily to registration.

What about backlog of images? It’s only possible to apply the ID on unlicensed images going forward, it cannot do this retrospectively – you need to have a starting point and move forward. The technology can track users and where the images move from and to and with previously licensed images it is difficult to be certain what their source is – could be multiple sources.

Question: Can you use Digmarc tech on video footage and will the barcodes (ID) distort the images. CS – their service can be added to each frame; however, it can’t be added to the entire file in one go. With regards to distortion, the barcode added are invisible to the eye and sits with the metadata, there should not be any distortion, this is an area (video) they are working on.

Question: Is the goal to prevent anyone from taking the image? RS – It’s all about commercialisation allowing content to perforate through the internet, ultimately it’s about monetizing content above and beyond.

Pixelrights technology is installed on StockPot Images – this is a good example of how the service works.

Advances In Visual Recognition
Moderator: Taylor Davidson        Panelists: Ramzi Rizk, Georgi Kadrev, Andreas Veit

Overview

Can computers do a better job at keywording and editing than humans? We will explore the latest advancements of visual recognition with those who create them.

Notes

Each of the panelists gave an overview of their company technology and presented instances of where the use of computers to replace humans in certain tasks can be beneficial, and highlighted some of the limitations.

Georgi Kardev – Imagga: develops image recognition technology wrapped in powerful API, to help enterprise and developers make sense of their growing image content.

Their main aim is to make images recognizable.

Their Buzz words are:

• Artificial intelligence
• Machine learning
• Deep learning

The technology is used to add tags to content, to speed up the process of delivery of content from production to distribution on the internet. Imagga is currently used by 180 companies and is one of the Global innovators of image Analytics of 2016.

Their technology can be applied to:

• Organization of personal / commercial photo collections
• For letting people into a bar or not
• Looking at computer or human generated results

Ramzi Rizk – EyeEm: a free photo & editing app on iPhone & Android.

They are creating a community of amateur photographers which has now grown to 18m photographers, 80m photos, 150+ countries

EyeEm curators use machine learning technology to filter and curate images. Curation can be based on brand identity, and the technology analysis aesthetic quality of each image.

Ratio of quality to noise is high.

Will this replace stock entirely?

Contribute content to Stock agencies

With the creation of so many images there are limited resources to assess and understand the content. EyeEm train the computers, harnessing this knowledge to manage the vast quantity of content through a series of filters.

The computers learn to understand what is in a photo and to recognize what is quality?

EyeEm have built tools to automate and train sources to make the process as automated as possible. To understand which images have aesthetic and commercial value? They tag the images using a controlled vocab that is understood in the industry.

On average, it takes 80mili-seconds per photo to sort and tag an image!

Andreas Veit – PhD researcher - Research perspective

This is an opportunity to combine academic research with industry. What can computers do now? Andreas believes that computers now can surpass human performance in certain areas. However, they can’t get into the creative space well. They aren’t able to ‘reason’, e.g. Getting a computer to understand heel size of a shoe.

Question: What is driving the research now?

RR – Abundance of data now available. Also more affordable to work with computers. The time taken for an image to get on the net for resale - only a few seconds to get to Instagram!

AV – technology is different today, better quality cameras and computers.

GK – people begin to see the benefits e.g. takes the burden of keywording off people and leaves more time for creativity and other useful tasks.

RR – Lack of diversity of images – picnic images all identical – too much conformity and no reality Difficult to train for all areas, eg concepts e.g. Lumbersexual – how do you train to recognize this particular fashion style?

RR – There’s an ongoing need to update keywording which can become stale and outdated e.g. couple - must review keywords as the meaning may change over time. We don’t need to recognise every single photo but need to be accurate in what we do recognise.

RR – Need to be able to modify keywords on the fly. Image recognition can be very biased. Computers do only what we tell them and research teams create biases. Need to make the data more diverse as it can create an embarrassing bias.

GK - thinks that the machines can overcome this. Believes that if you can define the problems then you can use the tech to resolve them.

Question: How long before computers will replace humans?

AV -Depends on the task. Recognising a face for example they are good at – But something creative will require a human to curate and guide.

RR – Big problem is the means to find the content which is commercially viable. Ramzi believes they can train the computer to understand what is a ‘good’ or ‘commercial’ photo. Would worry when it starts setting our taste and machines take over!!

GK – why would you want to recognise aesthetics? If you have historical or contextual data computers can come close to matching human performance. Thinks in the next 10 years we’ll be finding many tasks we now do are being done by computers.

RR – have trained the computers to understand levels of interest, but without knowing the context it’s unable to add that information. The editorial information is important to the computer to make that connection.

Question: Are there new advances in landmark and facial recognition? Or can the computer recognise the work of a specific photographer based on style?

RR – has trained computer to recognise the Eiffel Tower at night because of the need to get a release. Some of the facial recognition technology may not yet be available commercially.

GK – have been involved for 10 years in facial recognition. As more demand is created the tech companies will concentrate on specific areas. Facial recognition is used for celebrities but also for personal use.

AV - In future we will not be using Keywords for searching, it will be more around a conversational search to give a deeper understanding of the image.

GK - Are computers better than humans? It depends on what context you are looking; computers are better at speed and consistencies – if this is what you need, then it is better to use computer solutions/automation. However computers are useful tools, but they have no instincts.

Young Guns
Moderator: Ophelia Chong        Panelists: Kendal Henderson, Taylor Simpson, Matthew King, Pei Liew, Mary Galloway, Alena Jaffe

Overview

What are they up to? NYC based designers, all under 30. What inspires them? Where are they sourcing images? Where do they think stock is heading? How do they use social media for their clients? What are their thoughts on print vs web.

Notes

With charm and enthusiasm moderator Ophelia Chong of Stockpot Images fired a series of questions at group of 6 ‘Young Guns’ whose average age is 26:

When did you first own a mobile? Average age 11-12

When did you first own a computer? Surprisingly most were in mid-teens

When did you first go on social network and which one? Between 15-17

What’s your attention span – how long do you look at an image on Instagram? 5 seconds! Less than a goldfish…

So how do you select an image, what will stop you in your tracks?

Mary - Emotionally evocative

Matt – storytelling

Taylor – image only gives part of story the viewer brings their own message too, wants something simple

Kendall – if something relates to viewer, or creates a disruption in our landscape

What portrays that now?

Kendall - Depends on industry eg fashion was candid photography, now more high contrast, saturation of color, eg Calvin Klein

Alena – agreed the CK ad is successful as it portrays people in a new way (AS does it? New to them maybe!!)

What are you seeing at Google?

Pei – products for everyone. So, use a lot of found footage, very real montages of people living their life. Will shoot something rather than use stock. Only use stock as a starter to nail down narrative. Generally, will only use crowdstock.

Alena – use stock as initial way of selling clients into an idea. Then we create our own imagery. Could be Instagram images or other social media images. A lot of stock isn’t real enough for what we want to portray.

You grew up in a sharing era; things are free, so use stock as a jumping off point. Is this generational?

Kendall – internet gave us this opportunity.

If a company wants to rebrand, what direction would you take them in?

Taylor - Clients want to be part of the process. A lot of them want something new Kendall – it’s almost like we are putting together a board of photographers’ work. Conduit to a specific photographer

Matt – crowdsourcing helps you find a photographer that has the point of view that you need.

Harder with stock photography.

Alena –everyone has the cameras and the design tools available, and the spontaneity and lower attention span of users will challenge photographers to be more creative, or creative in different ways.

Clients are also finding images on Instagram and getting designers/photographers to create the image for them.

What’s your Inspiration?

Alena – galleries and museums and I step away from design whenever I can

Mary – I like to look away from design too. A lot of my work is 2D. I’m interested in textures. I feel a need to walk away from the digital design

Matt – outside of design which is where social media comes in – stepping into other worlds. Inspiration where I don’t have to get into it, but can observe it.

Pei - taking old iconic works and repurposing them. Inspiration in things that are funny or fun. Kendall – architectural photography. Striking – capturing something that has a separate function. Paring of older person and younger one for fashion poster. Disruptive.

Taylor- sports and Michael Jordan – striving to do better – inspired to look back and think how I can change history; Ying and yang – balancing; landscape – inspired to go and take my own photography in nature.

What is: The next global trend? – Over saturation

Next color? – Pink

Where are we going with virtual reality? – Brands are using it just to use it, should be for empathy.

What company is going to get huge? – Glossier, a beauty company run by women, understands the trends in makeup

Next act to die? – Facebook

How some agencies are bucking the trend and growing their traditional licensing businesses
Moderator: Lee Torrens       Panelists: Stephen Bock, Peter Hannert, Aaron Booth

Overview

Without inventing a new technology, or new business model or cutting prices to nothing, how can a traditional stock photo licensing business succeed and grow in the current market.

Notes

Stephan Bock – Westend61 – 350k images

German company, 300 active photographers. RM. Mostly German but European generally and some USA. Core is people and life style.

They are producers of hi-end imagery and distribute through non-exclusive global channels At the core are the photographers and creative/Art department.

Each photographer works with art director and they connect photographers with each other. They offer workshops so they can meet the team and they feel emotionally ‘at home’.

Challenges: Awareness of premium – new market players, what is quality/hi-end

How many photographers can we hold? Can they maintain authenticity if they grow too big?

Aaron Booth, Dissolve

Based in Calgary started years ago primarily as a stock video company, with over 1 million high quality video clips for licensing.

Main content being marketed is video – more advertising dollars are being spent on video marketing.

Brands report an average 65% increase in video spending and agencies are up by 83%. Core mission – to build a brand that connects with creative professionals and that stands for quality.

They use videos for marketing and are getting widespread press coverage:

• Dissolve filmmaker – marketing promo launching this week. Wholly owned content. Authentic, familiar, useful. Commercial concepts typically made for stock.

• Dissolve Auteur – inspiring creative ideas through content itself. Collection put together to help clients find ideas and content for their work

• Dissolve Elements – clips that are must-have fillers, scene setters.

Aaron presented a company self-promotion video which Dissolve created in the satirical style which marketers make Presidential campaign, using only their own clips. They do little promotion and most is done through peer to peer word of mouth.

Peter Hannert – Cavan Images

They work in a similar way to Westend61 and 50% of content is exclusive to their own site. Central to their mission is nurturing the 1000+ photographers of their curated content with the aim of telling inspiring stories.

How have you grown?

Dissolve – grown consistently and have 35 people now.

Westend – grown since last year in turnover and number of photogs and happiness! Very passionate about our work. We are working well and managing the challenges.

Caven – we receive over 100 photographer applications every few days. We want quality being considered more of a criterion and sees huge opportunities for creators with high quality imagery. Would like to see companies cap the number of images in their collection and that each image that comes in should have to earn its place, which should make the collection BETTER. That would make the buyers’ job easier. Don’t make collections bigger, make them better. It’s not necessary to have every scenario represented in your content, and if you care about customer experience it’s important to keep the bar high and do what customers want.

Distributors v. direct sales

Westend61 – most sold through distributors, but in future they are thinking of selling direct and using social media that they’ve used for working with photogs which has been bringing local clients to them.

Cavan – mostly sold through image partners. Some positive and some not so good experiences. You spend a lot of time protecting relationship of contributors so choose distributor carefully. Have an attitude – if you can’t find it - we’ll create it!

Dissolve - is a distributor of own stock. It’s not just about having great content. Getting customers to look at your images is tough. What stories are you telling around content to invite clients to look at it? All the work around the content needs to convey a message to make the customer care.

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